Undergraduate Options

UBC Vancouver

Launched in September 2006, the UBC Biomedical Engineering Program emphasizes undergraduate and graduate student training and research and development relating to medical equipment, treatment devices and diagnostic tools, as well as injury prevention and rehabilitation equipment.

Two engineering departments within the Faculty of Applied Science at UBC are offering biomedical engineering options in their bachelor’s program.

1. Electrical Engineering
2. Mechanical Engineering

Because the biomedical industry has strongly expressed that a firm foundation in engineering is one of the key components to becoming a biomedical engineer, the Faculty of Applied Science developed the biomedical engineering option in its undergraduate degree program so that engineering students could receive early exposure to biomedical engineering training. Students are encouraged to then pursue graduate-level training in biomedical engineering.

Explore the difference between the two options.

Electrical Engineering

The UBC Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) began offering a biomedical engineering option in its undergraduate degree program in September 2006, with students entering the option in their second year of electrical engineering. This is a three-year option that provides a solid foundation in electrical engineering and additional training in the following:

  • anatomy and physiology
  • biomedical instrumentation
  • micro/nano system design and analysis
  • biosignals and systems
  • medical imaging
  • regulatory standards and design processes
  • plus additional technical electives of your choice

No previous training or courses in biology or medicine are required.

The goal of the option is to give students the skills and practical experience to work in the diverse areas of biomedical engineering. Both traditional and project-integrated-program streams are available in second year, as well as cooperative education.

There is a growing demand for engineers with biomedical training. Demand comes from industry, such as medical devices and biotechnology, as well as academic research through advanced degrees. The driving forces behind this growth include an aging population, advances in biomedical technology and increased complexity of medical care. For more detailed information about the nature of biomedical engineering, growth trends and areas of specialization, consult the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society or the Biomedical Engineering Society. A recent forecast concluded, “The number of biomedical engineering jobs will climb almost twice as fast as the overall average for a 26.1 percent gain by 2012.”

UBC Applied Science is at the forefront of this growth by hiring new faculty in the area of biomedical engineering and expanding research facilities.

For further information on the Biomedical Engineering undergrad option in ECE contact:

Student Services
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
The University of British Columbia
2332 Main Mall, Room 2010
Vancouver, BC, Canada. V6T 1Z4
Phone: 604.822.2872
E-mail: ugradsec@ece.ubc.ca

See the Electrical Engineering Department Web site for more information about the Electrical Engineering Biomedical Option.

Mechanical Engineering

UBC’s Department of Mechanical Engineering (MECH) followed suit and has been offering biomedical engineering option since September 2007 for students entering their second year of mechanical engineering. This is a three-year option that provides a solid foundation in mechanical engineering and additional training in the following:

  • anatomy and physiology
  • biomedical equipment
  • biomaterials
  • biomedical design
  • current biomedical research
  • regulatory standards and design processes
  • plus additional technical electives of your choice.

No previous training or courses in biology or medicine are required.

The goal of the option is to give students the skills and practical experience to work in the diverse areas of biomedical engineering. All biomedical option students will take part in the innovative Mech 2 integrated program, which combines practicums, design projects and traditional coursework into a unified learning experience.  Biomedical option students may also choose to enroll in the Co-op program, allowing them to intersperse work experience terms with their studies.

There is a growing demand for engineers with biomedical training. Demand comes from industry, such as medical devices and biotechnology, as well as academic research through advanced degrees. The driving forces behind this growth include an aging population, advances in biomedical technology and increased complexity of medical care. For more detailed information about the nature of biomedical engineering, growth trends and areas of specialization, consult the Biomedical Engineering Society. A recent forecast concluded, “The number of biomedical engineering jobs will climb almost twice as fast as the overall average for a 26.1 percent gain by 2012.”

UBC Applied Science is at the forefront of this growth by hiring new faculty in the area of biomedical engineering and expanding research facilities.

Information on admission to this new option will be available in the spring.

For further information on the Biomedical Engineering option contact:

MECH Undergraduate Affairs
Department of Mechanical Engineering
The University of British Columbia
1214 – 6250 Applied Science Lane
Vancouver, BC, Canada. V6T 1Z4
Phone: 604.822.6584
E-mail: undergrad@mech.ubc.ca

See the Mechanical Engineering Department Web site for more information about the Mechanical Engineering Biomedical Option.